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HADDON (Sir Walter)

G. Haddoni legum doctoris, S. Reginæ Elizabethæ à supplicum libellis lucubrationes passim collectæ, & editæ. Studio & labore Thomæ Hatcheri, Cantabrigiensis. Ad Lectorum.

HADDON (Sir Walter)

G. Haddoni legum doctoris, S. Reginæ Elizabethæ à supplicum libellis lucubrationes passim collectæ, & editæ. Studio & labore Thomæ Hatcheri, Cantabrigiensis. Ad Lectorum. Londini, Apud Gulielmum Seresium, 1567

Description

2 parts in one volume, First Edition of Haddon’s letters and Third Edition enlarged of Haddon’s poems, small 4to, several large woodcut initials, with the final errata leaf S4 with a contemporary Ms. list of authors on blank verso, [8], 350 pp. Bound with:- HADDONI POEMATA. D. Gvalteri Haddoni, Legum Doctoris, serenissimæ reginæ Elizabethæ, à supplicum libellis, Poëmata, studio & labore Thomæ Hatcheri Cantabrigiensis sparsim collecta, & edita. [2], 140, [2] pp. Londini, APVD Gulielmum Seresium. 1567. 4to, black morocco, spine gilt in compartments, all edges gilt, a very nice copy.

Bibliography

STC, 12596.

Footnote

Part 1 has orations and epistles. Part 2 is an enlarged edition of “Haddoni Poëmata.”
“The emerging humanistic culture of mid-sixteenth-century Cambridge is further, and amply, illustrated by the Lucubrationes of the latin poet Walter Haddon, who was appointed Regius Professor of Civil Law at Cambridge University in March 1550/51, and was also created Master of Requests at the accession of Elizabeth. Haddon is a man of some significance in mid-sixteenth-century England as a statesman and man of letters with a wide circle of influential friends. His Lucubrationes passim collectae, & editae were gathered together by Thomas Hatcher, who later was also responsible for the publication of Nicholas Carr's De scriptorum britannicorum paucitate oratio in 1576. The Lucubrationes were printed in London in 1567 by William Seres. The whole volume is a mine of information about the intellectual condition of mid-century Cambridge. It is prefaced by preliminary verses from the Cambridge literati John Fryer and Abraham Hartwell the elder, and is dedicated [by Hatcher] to William Cecil as Chancellor of Cambridge University. There is also a prefatory letter from Thomas Wilson to Hatcher. The Lucubrationes contains some ten speeches which, as this letter makes clear, were actually delivered by Haddon, as well as the first collected edition of his poems, and copies of his letters to men such as Charles Brandon Duke of Suffolk, the Duke of Northumberland, Sir John Cheke, Thomas Wilson, Robert Dudley Earl of Leicester, Sir Thomas Smith, and the Portuguese controversialist Osorius da Fonseca. These speeches amply illustrate the intellectual life of the times, and Haddon makes frequent mention of the activities of his Cambridge contemporaries throughout. The orations provide an instant commentary on the state of learning at Cambridge in his day.Haddon's Lucubrationes is a key text for the understanding of the reception and assimilation of humane learning in sixteenth-century England.” - J. W. Binns, Intellectual Culture in Elizabethan and Jacobean England.

Price

£900.00